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Original Article

September 8, 2021


Associations of regional-level perceived stress and depression with health-related quality of life in Korean adults: a multilevel analysis of 2017 Korea Community Health Survey data
Eunsu Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Jung-Ho Yang, Soon-Ki Ahn, Baeg-Ju Na, Hae-Sung Nam
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021062.

Original Article

August 17, 2021


Accelerometer-measured stepping cadence patterns in Korean adults: an analysis of data from the 2014-2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Geon Hui Kim, Hoyong Sung, Yeun Ryu, Jungjun Lim, Joon-Sik Kim, Hak Kyun Kim, Yeon Soo Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021056.

Original Article

August 18, 2021


Employment status and mortality among Korean men over a 13-year period
Dohee Lim, Kyoung Ae Kong, Hyesook Park, Kyunghee Jung-Choi
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021055.

Perspective

August 18, 2021


Herd immunity: challenges and the way forward in Korea
Jiyoung Oh, Sohyun Kim, Boyeong Ryu, Minjoung Shin, Bryan Inho Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021054.

COVID-19: Brief Communication

August 3, 2021


Hydrogen peroxide as an auxiliary treatment for COVID-19 in Brazil: a randomized double-blind clinical trial
Marielle Bazzo Di Domênico, Kauê Collares, Renan Brandenburg dos Santos, Ulysses Lenz, Vinícius Picoli Antunes, Vinicius Webber Godinho, Henrique Cesca, Thales Henrique Jincziwski Ponciano, Pedro Henrique Corazza
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021051.

Current Issue
Volume 43; 2021
Original Article Associations of regional-level perceived stress and depression with health-related quality of life in Korean adults: a multilevel analysis of 2017 Korea Community Health Survey data
Eunsu Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Jung-Ho Yang, Soon-Ki Ahn, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021062.
  • Abstract
  • View article
  • Korean summary
Original Article Accelerometer-measured stepping cadence patterns in Korean adults: an analysis of data from the 2014-2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Geon Hui Kim, Hoyong Sung, Yeun Ryu, Jungjun Lim, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021056.
  • Abstract
  • View article
  • Korean summary
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
We examined the associations of individual and regional-level perceived stress and depression with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Korean adults.
METHODS:
We used data from the 2017 Korea Community Health Survey, which included 216,713 adults living within 254 municipal districts. As individual-level independent variables, perceived stress (higher vs. lower) and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 ≥10) were defined. Regional-level age-adjusted rates of perceived stress (%) and depression (%) were created for 254 municipal districts and categorized into quartiles to generate regional levels of stress and depression. HRQOL was defined as the individual-level EuroQol 5-dimensional index×100. A multilevel analysis was performed to identify the relationship between individual or regional-level independent variables and individual HRQOL.
RESULTS:
In the null model, the proportions of individual variation in the HRQOL explained by region were 1.7% and 2.7% for men and women, respectively. When adjusted with all individual-level variables, regional stress and depression, as well as individual-level perceived stress and depression, were significantly related to HRQOL for both genders. In the full model including all variables, the decrease in HRQOL from the first to the fourth quartile group of regional stress was greater in women (-1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.87 to -0.31) than in men (-0.65; 95% CI, -1.04 to -0.26).
CONCLUSIONS:
Our results suggest that regional-level perceived stress and depression, as well as individual-level perceived stress and depression, are inversely associated with individual HRQOL.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
The aim of this study was to identify the stepping cadence patterns in Korean adults by using objectively measured accelerometer data to analyze the time spent in each cadence category by sex and age.
METHODS:
During the 2014-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1,703 males and females aged 19-64 years provided at least 1 valid day of data (wearing an accelerometer ≥ 10 hr/d). The mean cumulative time and percentage per day in 8 cadence categories (0, 1-19, 20-29, 30-59, 60-79, 80-99, 100-119, and ≥ 120 steps/min) by sex and age group were calculated.
RESULTS:
Cumulative time and percentage per day decreased across the incremental cadence categories. Participants spent 360.08± 2.56 min/d in the non-movement cadence category and 361.50± 2.28 min/d in the incidental movement cadence category. However, they spent only about 18.1 min/d (2.1%) at ≥ 100 steps/min. Males spent significantly more time in the cadence categories of sporadic movement, purposeful steps, slow walking, and medium walking, but the other categories, except for brisk walking, had higher values in females (p< 0.001). The older age group spent less time in non-movement cadence categories, and the youngest and oldest groups spent more time at a higher cadence (≥ 100 steps/min) than the other age groups. Similar patterns were found in a subgroup analysis by sex.
CONCLUSIONS:
Korean adults spent most of their time at a low cadence and only a few minutes at a high cadence (≥100 steps/min); this trend was consistent across sex and age groups.
Original Article Employment status and mortality among Korean men over a 13-year period
Dohee Lim, Kyoung Ae Kong, Hyesook Park, Kyunghee Jung-Choi Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021055.
  • Abstract
  • View article
  • Korean summary
  • Supplementary data
Perspective Herd immunity: challenges and the way forward in Korea
Jiyoung Oh, Sohyun Kim, Boyeong Ryu, Minjoung Shin, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021054.
  • Abstract
  • View article
  • Korean summary
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
This study explored the effect of employment status on mortality over a 13-year period in Korean men.
METHODS:
Data were used from the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study from 1999 to 2012. This study started with 2,737 subjects and included employed men in good health, aged 30-69 years. Deaths were tracked for 13 years from 2000 to 2012. Employment status classifications were: (1) regular employees, (2) precarious employees, (3) petty bourgeoisie, and (4) employers. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model, and were adjusted for age, education, income, and occupation, with regular employees as the reference category. To examine the effect of employment status and include employment history, the risk ratios of mortality were measured using the Poisson regression model, considering the duration of each employment and using 0 years as the reference category.
RESULTS:
Over the course of the 13-year study, being a precarious employee (HR, 1.84) or petty bourgeoisie (HR, 1.87) at a particular point in time had a negative effect on mortality when compared with regular employees. Furthermore, working as precarious employees or petty bourgeoisie had no positive effect on mortality. A positive effect was observed, however, on the overall mortality risk for regular employees.
CONCLUSIONS:
These results suggest that a healthy social policy is needed for precarious employees and petty bourgeoisie to avoid disadvantages in the workplace and the social safety net.
Abstract
Vaccination is considered to be the most effective measure for preventing the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Many countries, including of Korea, are focusing on achieving herd immunity with the goal of reaching a vaccination rate of 70-80%. However, achieving herd immunity does not mean eradicating COVID-19, and the following challenges can occur in the process of achieving herd immunity. First, as the vaccination rate is likely to slow down over time, it is necessary to promote the benefits of vaccination through risk communication strategies and provide incentives for those who have been vaccinated. Second, a booster dose may be required depending on future studies on vaccine-induced immunity. Third, since variants capable of evading immunity and with higher transmissibility can emerge, rapid contract tracing and regular community genomic surveillance could help mitigate the impact of new variants. When the impact of COVID-19 is controlled to the level of seasonal influenza, the current public health measures that have been strictly imposed on society since the beginning of the pandemic will no longer be needed. The overall response strategy to COVID-19 will need to change accordingly, based on evaluations of the level of population immunity. These changes will include more efficient and targeted contact tracing and eased quarantine measures for vaccinated close contacts and travelers. Mask wearing and a minimum of social distancing will still be required in the journey towards the end of the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic will end, but the virus will not disappear.
COVID-19: Brief Communication Hydrogen peroxide as an auxiliary treatment for COVID-19 in Brazil: a randomized double-blind clinical trial
Marielle Bazzo Di Domênico, Kauê Collares, Renan Brandenburg dos Santos, Ulysses Lenz, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021051.
  • Abstract
  • View article
Brief Communication Cancer incidence in the Tobruk area, eastern Libya: first results from Tobruk Medical Centre
Faisal Ismail, Ahmed G. Elsayed, Islam El-Garawani, Eman Abdelsameea Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021050.
  • Abstract
  • View article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
This study evaluated the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as mouthwash and nasal spray on symptom relief in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients.
METHODS:
Patients positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), who were treated in a hospital or at home, and patients’ family members (not positive for SARS-CoV-2), were randomized into 2 groups: experimental (1% H2O2 for gargling, 0.5% H2O2 for nasal wash), and control. Patients gargled the solution 3 times a day, and applied the nasal spray twice a day, for a 7-day period. Family members received the same treatment as the treated COVID-19 patient. The researchers contacted patients every 2 days over an 8-day period. An average post-treatment interval of 8 days passed before testing family members.
RESULTS:
The most frequent symptoms on day 0 were cough, loss of taste, and hyposmia; there were no significant differences between groups, independent of the period. The symptom of dyspnea presented a significant difference between days 2 and 4 (p<0.05). Among family members, 86.0% had no antibodies, 2.3% had antibodies, and 11.6% had active infections (4 in the experimental group and 6 in the control group). The most frequent adverse effects in the H2O2 group were a burning throat and nose.
CONCLUSIONS:
H2O2 was not effective for the relief of COVID-19 symptoms and was associated with reports of transient adverse effects.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and it is an increasing problem in developing countries. Estimation of the incidence of cancer is important, especially in regions with limited epidemiological data on cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide an updated report on the incidence of cancers in the Tobruk region in eastern Libya.
METHODS:
Data on cancer patients from the records of the Department of Histopathology of Tobruk Medical Centre from January 2013 to June 2020 were included.
RESULTS:
In total, 402 cases were recorded. Men patients accounted for 30.3% (n=122) of cases, and women patients represented 69.6% (n=280). The overall mean age at the time of the first diagnosis was 49.0±17.1 years. The most common malignancies were breast and uterine cancer in women (18.4%, n=74; 15.9%, n=64, respectively), colorectal cancer (11.6%, n=47; 26 in women and 21 in men), bladder cancer (8.2%, n=33; 8 in women and 25 in men), and thyroid cancer (8.0%, n=32; 23 in women and 9 in men).
CONCLUSIONS:
Breast and uterine cancers were the most common cancers in women, and bladder and colorectal cancer were the most common cancers in men, followed by colorectal cancer in both genders. These data will help health authorities launch preventive plans for cancer in the region. Further studies to identify aetiological factors and cancer-related risk factors need to be conducted in the region.

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